Identity


Garden sprouted as a one-woman idea inside a small, sea-salted café nestled before the rolling waves of the Pacific Ocean. Elizabeth was cupping her warm coffee and gazing out into the café patio, ignoring the blinking cursor in her empty Word document. The patio was quiet, intimate, dark green. Tall sweet bay and lilac trees shrouded the sides like a hug, wrapping everything in shadow and fractured light. Vines twisted above on the roof and around the rusted round tables, and potted plants outnumbered the people, sitting quietly as they were before their computers. Like Elizabeth, many of them seemed to be writers. Their screens glowed with open documents, and they all wore the same day-dreamy expression. All leaned back and became lost in other worlds.

The atmosphere felt strangely like nothing Elizabeth had experienced before. She’d been to numerous cafés, libraries, coastal hotels with balconies overlooking beautiful ocean views to write. But this felt different, as if she had peeled back the normal layer of reality and witnessed something serendipitous. It seemed a unique haven, somewhere extraordinarily safe and comfortable, nearly bursting with the potential for growth.

To a different effect, it felt to her like a garden of creativity, and a handshake of the best kind. A symbiotic relationship between writer and environment. All the nature enveloping the writers looked like the physical manifestation of creativity, erupting and twisting around the artists on the patio. And the artists looked the gardeners, those that cultivated, pruned, and cared for the life force of the garden itself.

The experience inspired Elizabeth, and she created Garden. And while there are many other wonderful literary journals that exist, she hopes that another one won’t hurt, and will instead act like another Eden of fruit for the starving writers of the world.

Hello. I’m Elizabeth. It is nice to meet you. I hope you’ll stay awhile here. There are going to be many fantastic stories for us to share together, and hopefully a few of yours that Garden can help nurture. As to what kind of stories, we’re open to anything. I’m a voracious and affable reader, and I believe that a quality literature diet includes portions of every genre, story type, and form. Send us what you wish to share.

If you need to contact me, you may do so at contact@gardenliteraryreview.com.

While Garden waits for stories to share, below are the links to some others that we enjoy (although it’s by all means not the entire list):


Click to read this story at The Paris Review. . .https://www.theparisreview.org/fiction/5980/faces-aimee-bender

Click to read this poem at Haunted Waters Press. . .https://www.hauntedwaterspress.com/od/

Click to read this story on the North Dakota University website. . .https://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/~cinichol/CreativeWriting/323/WhereAreYouGoing.htm

Click to read this story in Strange Horizons. . .http://strangehorizons.com/fiction/bathymetry/

Click to read this poem at Rattle. . .https://www.rattle.com/?s=nardine+taleb&submit=Search

Click to read this story in Granta. . .https://granta.com/horror-story/

Click to read this story at Waxwing. . .http://waxwingmag.org/items/issue19/36_Pillow-Where-Did-All-The-Older-Women-Go.php

Click to read this story in Ploughshares. . .https://www.pshares.org/solos/rat-king-scattered

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